Economic survey of Denmark 2008

 

 

Contents | Executive summary | How to obtain this publication | Additional info

Published on 19 February 2008. The next Economic Survey of Denmark will be prepared for 2010.

An Economic Survey is published every 1½-2 years for each OECD country. Read more about how Surveys are prepared. The OECD assessment and recommendations on the main economic challenges faced by Denmark are available by clicking on each chapter heading below.

Bookmark this page: www.oecd.org/eco/surveys/denmark

Contents                                                                                                                             

Chapter 1: Key challenges for the Danish economy

The Danish economy has come to a pivotal point. A lot has been achieved over the past 25 years, thanks to stability-oriented macroeconomic policies and gradual forward-looking reforms. Following rapid debt reduction, public finances are better prepared for population ageing than in most OECD countries. Moreover, the flexible labour market, combined with active support for those losing jobs, makes a good starting point to benefit from globalisation. Yet, economic stability could be at risk now: unsustainable wage increases could undermine the stability of inflation expectations, and thus the current boom could end in a major hike in unemployment going well above structural equilibrium levels. A strong correction could then be triggered in the housing market and could lead to a recession which might be prolonged. This chapter starts with the urgent challenge of avoiding overheating and the requirements for fiscal policy. Thereafter, it assesses the economy from a structural perspective and indentifies the key challenges in the short- and medium-term.

 

Chapter 2: Fiscal strategy: keeping with the targets

The government’s new 2015 Strategy provides a valuable framework for focusing on the long run fiscal position and highlighting the impact of reforms to improve publicly funded services and the tax system. The paths envisaged for the fiscal balance and public spending are reasonable, but the strategy lacks a rigorous set of mechanisms to ensure that the targets are adhered to. The somewhat loosely formulated targets for public consumption spending could be problematic, because spending overruns, in particular in the sub-national parts of government, have often been the Achilles heel of fiscal management. The purpose of this chapter is to assess options for establishing mechanisms to ensure targets are met.

 

Chapter 3: Promoting employment and inclusiveness

Unemployment reached a three–decade low already by mid 2006, and has fallen further since then. A number of indicators suggest that the labour market is “tight” although wages growth has been benign until recently. This may be explained by a fall in the level of structural unemployment, but also changes in the industry composition of the economy that may have helped to contain overall wage growth pressures. Even so, the actual unemployment rate is now clearly below the NAIRU and recent data suggest some reaction of wages to the very tight labour market conditions. With continued, albeit somewhat more modest, economic growth projected and the government’s new 2015 Strategy for fiscal policy relying on strong gains in labour utilisation, efforts to increase labour supply will have to be redoubled. This chapter assesses the prospect of promoting further employment growth, given the current labour market patterns.

 

Chapter 4: Tax reform, hours worked and growth

The new medium-term fiscal strategy requires that average hours worked are kept constant in a context where demographic changes would imply a 2% decline towards 2015. Tax reform could make a significant contribution to achieving this objective, provided that the cuts focus on areas where they could reduce distortions the most and that they are appropriately financed. This chapter analyses the relative merits of the enlarged in-work tax credit introduced in 2008 and the higher threshold for the middle tax to be introduced from 2009. It also presents the results of a new OECD study on hours worked. Finally, it discusses the long-run prospects of maintaining a system where four out of ten full time employed face a marginal tax wedge of more than 70% resulting from contributions plus income and consumption taxes combined.

 

Chapter 5: Health: a major fiscal challenge

Over the past few years, the Danish health system has improved. Yet when looking ahead, further pressures should be expected from new costly medical technologies expanding the range of conditions that can be treated, as well as from continued demand for shorter waiting times and care that responds to individual needs. Managing healthcare spending may well be the largest fiscal challenge over the coming decades. Sustaining universal public health insurance financed by general taxation should be feasible, but it will require continued efforts to enhance efficiency via organisational adjustments, refined economic incentives and the adoption of cost-saving treatment practices. At the same time, promoting healthy nutrition and lifestyles should have higher priority, and the system as a whole should be more engaged in helping to prevent people with health problems ending up being excluded from the labour market.

 

Chapter 6: Pension savings and capital taxation

The Danish pension system is well-developed and almost unique in the OECD. It combines widespread take up of defined contribution pension schemes with high contribution rates set in collective agreements. The original targets for contribution rates have been reached and the system delivers good results, but there are a number of changes that could make it more robust and efficient. The flexibility of the institutional structure could be increased and, while leaving the key parameters of the pension taxation system as they are, other aspects of capital taxation could be improved.
 

How to obtain this publication                                                                                   

The Policy Brief (pdf format) can be downloaded in English. It contains the OECD assessment and recommendations.The complete edition of the Economic survey of Denmark 2008 is available from:

Additional information                                                                                                  

 

For further information please contact the Denmark Desk at the OECD Economics Department at eco.survey@oecd.org.  The OECD Secretariat's report was prepared by Jens Lundsgaard and David Turvey under the supervision of Stefano Scarpetta. Research assistance was provided by Lutécia Daniel.

 

 

 

Countries list

  • Afghanistan
  • Albania
  • Algeria
  • Andorra
  • Angola
  • Anguilla
  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Argentina
  • Armenia
  • Aruba
  • Australia
  • Austria
  • Azerbaijan
  • Bahamas
  • Bahrain
  • Bangladesh
  • Barbados
  • Belarus
  • Belgium
  • Belize
  • Benin
  • Bermuda
  • Bhutan
  • Bolivia
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Botswana
  • Brazil
  • Brunei Darussalam
  • Bulgaria
  • Burkina Faso
  • Burundi
  • Cambodia
  • Cameroon
  • Canada
  • Cape Verde
  • Cayman Islands
  • Central African Republic
  • Chad
  • Chile
  • China (People’s Republic of)
  • Chinese Taipei
  • Colombia
  • Comoros
  • Congo
  • Cook Islands
  • Costa Rica
  • Croatia
  • Cuba
  • Cyprus
  • Czech Republic
  • Côte d'Ivoire
  • Democratic People's Republic of Korea
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Denmark
  • Djibouti
  • Dominica
  • Dominican Republic
  • Ecuador
  • Egypt
  • El Salvador
  • Equatorial Guinea
  • Eritrea
  • Estonia
  • Ethiopia
  • European Union
  • Faeroe Islands
  • Fiji
  • Finland
  • Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM)
  • France
  • French Guiana
  • Gabon
  • Gambia
  • Georgia
  • Germany
  • Ghana
  • Gibraltar
  • Greece
  • Greenland
  • Grenada
  • Guatemala
  • Guernsey
  • Guinea
  • Guinea-Bissau
  • Guyana
  • Haiti
  • Honduras
  • Hong Kong, China
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • India
  • Indonesia
  • Iraq
  • Ireland
  • Islamic Republic of Iran
  • Isle of Man
  • Israel
  • Italy
  • Jamaica
  • Japan
  • Jersey
  • Jordan
  • Kazakhstan
  • Kenya
  • Kiribati
  • Korea
  • Kuwait
  • Kyrgyzstan
  • Lao People's Democratic Republic
  • Latvia
  • Lebanon
  • Lesotho
  • Liberia
  • Libya
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Luxembourg
  • Macao (China)
  • Madagascar
  • Malawi
  • Malaysia
  • Maldives
  • Mali
  • Malta
  • Marshall Islands
  • Mauritania
  • Mauritius
  • Mayotte
  • Mexico
  • Micronesia (Federated States of)
  • Moldova
  • Monaco
  • Mongolia
  • Montenegro
  • Montserrat
  • Morocco
  • Mozambique
  • Myanmar
  • Namibia
  • Nauru
  • Nepal
  • Netherlands
  • Netherlands Antilles
  • New Zealand
  • Nicaragua
  • Niger
  • Nigeria
  • Niue
  • Norway
  • Oman
  • Pakistan
  • Palau
  • Palestinian Administered Areas
  • Panama
  • Papua New Guinea
  • Paraguay
  • Peru
  • Philippines
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Puerto Rico
  • Qatar
  • Romania
  • Russian Federation
  • Rwanda
  • Saint Helena
  • Saint Kitts and Nevis
  • Saint Lucia
  • Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Samoa
  • San Marino
  • Sao Tome and Principe
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Senegal
  • Serbia
  • Serbia and Montenegro (pre-June 2006)
  • Seychelles
  • Sierra Leone
  • Singapore
  • Slovak Republic
  • Slovenia
  • Solomon Islands
  • Somalia
  • South Africa
  • South Sudan
  • Spain
  • Sri Lanka
  • Sudan
  • Suriname
  • Swaziland
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • Syrian Arab Republic
  • Tajikistan
  • Tanzania
  • Thailand
  • Timor-Leste
  • Togo
  • Tokelau
  • Tonga
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • Tunisia
  • Turkey
  • Turkmenistan
  • Turks and Caicos Islands
  • Tuvalu
  • Uganda
  • Ukraine
  • United Arab Emirates
  • United Kingdom
  • United States
  • United States Virgin Islands
  • Uruguay
  • Uzbekistan
  • Vanuatu
  • Venezuela
  • Vietnam
  • Virgin Islands (UK)
  • Wallis and Futuna Islands
  • Western Sahara
  • Yemen
  • Zambia
  • Zimbabwe