Competition

Price discrimination and competition

 

Price discrimination is common in many different types of markets, whether online or offline, and even among firms with no market power; it usually reflects the competitive behaviour that competition policy seeks to promote (either by incentivising firms to serve more consumers, or by increasing the incentive to compete) and hence has no anti-competitive purpose or effect. However, price discrimination can sometimes be a concern, for example if it has exploitative, distortionary or exclusionary effects.

In recent years, the scope for near perfect price discrimination in the digital economy appears to have grown, and there has been debate as to whether the rules and case law that apply to distortionary effects of price discrimination have an economic basis. In November 2016, the OECD held a roundtable to discuss how jurisdictions in which exploitative or distortionary price discrimination is an offence should respond to these developments.

» Read the OECD background paper

» Read the blog: The end of the bargain? And should we worry?

» Full list of Competition Policy Roundtables

NOVEMBER 2016 SESSION DOCUMENTATION

Panelists, papers and presentations

Background note by the Secretariat

Note de référence du Secrétariat

 

Dennis CARLTON Bio
Professor of Economics, University of Chicago Booth School of Business 
presenting Price discrimination

Damien GERADIN Bio
Founding partner, Edge Legal Thinking 

Contributions from participants

Summary of contributions

Argentina

Belgium

BIAC

Costa Rica

Indonesia

Israel

Japan

 

Lithuania

Romania

Russia

Sweden

Chinese Taipei

United Kingdom

United States

PRESENTATIONS


Background note – OECD Competition Division

 


Damien GERADIN – Edge Legal Thinking  

 


UK Financial Conduct Authority  

RELATED MATERIAL

Fidelity rebates, 2016

Excessive prices, 2011

Margin squeeze, 2009

Predatory foreclosure, 2004

 

» Access the full list of Competition Policy Roundtables

» Link to the OECD Competition Home Page 

 

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