Publications & Documents


  • 12-June-2015

    English

  • 22-May-2015

    English

    OECD methodology for calculating imputed multilateral ODA

    DAC statistics are primarily designed to measure donor effort. The following note describes the OECD DAC’s methodology for calculating imputed multilateral flows, that is imputing aid by multilateral bodies back to the funders of these bodies so that total donor outflows that can be assigned to an individual recipient.

  • 19-May-2015

    English

    History of DAC Lists of aid recipient countries

    The DAC List of ODA Recipients is designed for statistical purposes. It helps to measure and classify aid and other resource flows originating in donor countries.

    Related Documents
  • 18-May-2015

    English

    Information note on the procedure for proposals for changes to the List of ODA-eligible international organisations

    Information note on the procedure for proposals for changes to the List of ODA-eligible international organisations

  • 8-April-2015

    English

    Development aid stable in 2014 but flows to poorest countries still falling

    Development aid flows were stable in 2014, after hitting an all-time high in 2013, but aid to the poorest countries continued to fall, according to official data collected by the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC).

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  • 7-April-2015

    English

    Development finance institutions and private sector development

    National and international development finance institutions (DFIs) are specialised development banks or subsidiaries set up to support private sector development in developing countries. They are usually majority owned by national governments and source their capital from national or international development funds or benefit from government guarantees.

  • 25-February-2015

    English

    Non-ODA flows to developing countries: Innovative financing for development

    Innovative financing for development refers to initiatives that aim to raise new funds for development, or optimise the use of traditional funding sources. They aim to narrow the gap between the resources needed to achieve the Millennium Development Goals, and the resources actually available.

  • 24-February-2015

    English

    Non-ODA flows to developing countries: Remittances

    In the context of the current global financial crisis, remittances represent an important source of finance for many developing countries, especially as they tend to rise during downturns in the receiving economy – unlike capital flows such as foreign direct investment, which tend to fall.

  • 24-February-2015

    English

    Non-ODA flows to developing countries: Export credits

    In parallel with ODA, export credits extended by official-export credit agencies also help finance large-scale projects in key sectors such as infrastructure, especially when they are perceived as economically viable.

  • 24-February-2015

    English

    Non-ODA flows to developing countries: Foreign Direct Investment

    Foreign direct investment (FDI) can provide financial stability, promote economic development and enhance the well-being of societies. FDI is also considered as one of the most development-friendly sources of investment, as it can create jobs, develop technology and new productive capacity, and help local firms access new international markets.

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