Publications & Documents


  • 30-October-2017

    English

    Development Co-operation Report 2017 - Data for Development

    Ninety per cent of all the world’s data were generated in the last two years alone. “Big data” and the “Internet of things” are more than buzzwords: the data revolution is transforming the way economies and societies are functioning across the planet. This is an opportunity that should not to be missed: more and better data can help boost inclusive growth, fight inequalities and combat climate change. These data are also essential to measure and monitor progress against the Sustainable Development  Goals.
     
    The value of data in enabling development is uncontested. Yet, we still lack good quality data in most developing countries. Why are over half of deaths and one-third of births worldwide unaccounted for? Why is investment in statistical capacity - 0.25% of ODA - not a priority for most providers of development assistance?

    There is a need for stronger political leadership, greater investment and more collective action to bridge the data divide. This report makes a strong business case for strengthening national statistical systems. With the unfolding data revolution, developing countries and donors have a unique chance to act now to boost data production and use for the benefit of citizens. This volume sets out a number of priority steps and good practices that will help policy makers and providers of development assistance to make data work for development.

    The profiles of providers of development co-operation (Part II of this report) are already available. The full report will be released in October 2017.

  • 30-September-2017

    English

    Production Transformation Policy Reviews - Identifying Actionable Policy Options to Succeed in a Changing World

    As countries are increasingly concerned with the future of globalisation and industry and their role in global production networks, defining and implementing policies for economic transformation that deliver on the competitive, social, and environmental goals has become paramount. The complex and fast-changing global economic landscape calls for a better understanding of the ongoing technological and industrial re-organisation, to enable policy makers to better plan and act for the present and the future. The Production Transformation Policy Reviews (PTPRs) are the policy tool for assessment and guidance on strategies for economic transformation. Developed within the framework of the OECD Initiative for Policy Dialogue on Global Value Chains, Production Transformation and Development, the PTPRs provide a guiding framework to inform policy choices on competitiveness.

    This document clarifies the rationale for the PTPRs as a policy assessment and guidance tool, presents the conceptual framework, clarifies the value proposition, and provides information about the review process.

  • 30-September-2017

    English

    Illicit Financial Flows - Illicit Trade and Development Challenges in West Africa

    This report shows how criminal economies and illicit financial flows through and within West Africa affect people’s lives. It goes beyond the traditional analysis of illicit financial flows, which focuses on the value of monetary flows. The report exposes the ways in which criminal and illicit activities and resulting illicit financial flows damage governance, the economy, development and security. It presents case studies based on concrete examples from West Africa of human trafficking, drug smuggling, counterfeit goods, gold mining and terrorism financing. It identifies networks and drivers – in the region or elsewhere – that allow these criminal economies to thrive, by feeding and facilitating these activities and the circulation of illicitly-obtained revenue. It also examines the impacts on local communities, such as changes in wealth distribution, power dynamics and the degree to which illicit money undermines social organisation.

    This book proposes a policy framework for both source and destination countries of illicit flows that looks beyond the concerns of developed countries to enhance development prospects at the local level and respond to the needs of the most vulnerable stakeholders. Combating criminal economies and preventing illicit financial flows will require sustained partnerships between producing and consuming countries. West Africa cannot be expected to address these challenges alone.

  • 28-June-2017

    English

    The Netherlands is an innovative aid provider but budget pressures a concern

    The Netherlands has responded to new global goals and challenges by integrating its aid, trade and investment agendas, and is an innovator in using aid flows to mobilise significant additional and responsible resources from the private sector, according to a new OECD report.

    Related Documents
  • 28-June-2017

    English

    OECD Development Co-operation Peer Reviews: The Netherlands 2017

    The OECD’s Development Assistance Committee (DAC) conducts periodic reviews of the individual development co-operation efforts of DAC members. The policies and programmes of each DAC member are critically examined approximately once every five years. DAC peer reviews assess the development co-operation performance across government of a given member and examine policy, finance and implementation. They take an integrated, system-wide view of the development co-operation and humanitarian assistance activities and seek input from a wide range of stakeholders – civil society, parliament, private sector and partner countries.
    This review assesses the performance of the Netherlands, including looking at its integrated aid, trade and investment policy focus, and its approach to partnerships.

  • 21-June-2017

    English

    Qatar's Development Co-operation

    The latest foreign aid report published by Qatar covers 2013 (Government of Qatar, 2014). Based on that report, the OECD estimates that Qatar’s development co-operation amounted to USD 1.3 billion in 2013, up from USD 543 million in 2012.

  • 20-June-2017

    English

    South Africa's Development Co-operation

    South Africa’s total concessional finance for development reached USD 100 million in 2015, compared to USD 148 million in 2014 (OECD estimates based on Government of South Africa, 2016; and websites of multilateral organisations). In 2015, South Africa channelled USD 80.4 million through multilateral organisations.

  • 20-June-2017

    English

    Mexico's Development Co-operation

    In 2016, Mexico published figures on its development co-operation programme for 2014 (Government of Mexico, 2016); these are the most recent consolidated figures available on Mexico’s development co-operation. According to these figures, Mexico’s international development co-operation reached USD 288 million in 2014, down from USD 396 million in 2013 (Government of Mexico, 2016).

  • 20-June-2017

    English

  • 20-June-2017

    English

    Colombia's Development Co-operation

    Colombia’s total concessional finance for development reached USD 42 million in 2015, compared to USD 45 million in 2014 (OECD estimates based on Government of Colombia, 2014, 2015; and websites of multilateral organisations). In 2015, Colombia channelled USD 30.9 million in development-orientated contributions through multilateral organisations and USD 10.8 million through South-South co-operation programmes and initiatives.

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