Peer reviews of DAC members

Sweden - DAC Peer Review of Development Co-operation, 2013

 

Sweden is a generous aid donor that has put development at the heart of its foreign policy

Sweden delivered USD 5.24 billion in official development assistance (ODA) in 2012, or 0.99% of its gross national income (GNI). It is the second most generous member of the OECD’s Development Assistance Committee (DAC), which groups the world’s major donors, when ODA is measured on a GNI basis. The DAC commends Sweden for budgeting to reach its 1% ODA/GNI target each year since its last peer review in a climate of global financial crisis.

 “Sweden has put development at the heart of its foreign policy agenda, showing a strong willingness to take the lead in addressing global challenges,” said OECD DAC Chair Erik Solheim. “We commend Sweden for its efforts to meet a medium-term goal of maintaining aid at 1% of GNI, and remain confident that recently completed reforms should strengthen its ability to deliver an effective aid programme.”

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About
this review

Sweden's
peer review history

 

Implementation of
peer review recommendations from 2009

In 2013 Sweden had implemented or partially implemented most of the recommendations from the 2009 peer review. It continues to be one of the most generous DAC members at a time of global financial crisis and the DAC commends it for budgeting to reach its 1% ODA/GNI target each year since its last peer review. Read more

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Sweden’s results reporting on democracy and human rights

In 2012 Sida published Results for Justice and Development - Report on Sida’s results on Democracy, Human Rights and the Human Rights Based Approach. It analyses 24 contributions out of the 1 233 that are promoting democracy and human rights. The contributions were chosen at random, but were supplemented with a few strategically selected examples to ensure that relevant types of contributions and regions were covered. The report analyses each contribution’s objectives and results (outputs and outcomes), and explores risks and how these were managed.  In addition, it has a whole chapter dedicated to dialogue and the important role this played in delivering results. The report is an impressive example of how it is possible to measure and report on difficult and often qualitative results. (see box 6.1, p.93) 

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