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  • 17-July-2018

    English

    States of Fragility 2018

    Three years into the 2030 Agenda it is already apparent that those living in fragile contexts are the furthest behind. Not all forms of fragility make it to the public’s eye: fragility is an intricate beast, sometimes exposed, often lurking underneath, but always holding progress back. Conflict, forced displacement, violent extremism, famine etc. are all causes and consequences of fragility. Hence the need to better understand, anticipate and respond to fragility.States of Fragility 2018 exposes the critical challenge posed by fragility in achieving the aspirations of the 2030 Agenda, sustainable development and peace. It highlights twelve key aspects of fragility, defying common assumptions and simplistic categorisation. It documents progress made in fragile situations on attaining sustainable development, unveiling exit doors from the fragility trap. It then illustrates the current state of financing to address fragility and suggests more effective approaches, accounting for its multidimensionality.Above all, the report aims to strike a balance between fragility's inherent complexity and the degree of simplicity that is required for efficient policy and decision making, namely through systems-based thinking; longer-term, consistent aid plans; the financing of peace; and a persistent focus on human beings. 
  • 10-July-2018

    English

    Mainstreaming Biodiversity for Sustainable Development

    The need to mainstream biodiversity into economic growth and development is being increasingly recognised and is now also firmly embedded in the Sustainable Development Goals. Drawing on experiences and insights from 16 predominantly megadiverse countries, this report examines how biodiversity is being mainstreamed in four key areas: 1) at the national level, including national development plans and other strategies, institutional co-ordination and national budgets; 2) the agriculture, forestry and fisheries sectors; 3) in development co-operation; and 4) the monitoring and evaluation of biodiversity mainstreaming and how this could be improved.
  • 9-July-2018

    English

    OECD Statistics on External Development Finance Targeting Environmental Objectives Including the Rio Conventions

    Statistics on external development finance extended with the purpose of assisting developing countries in the implementation of the three Rio Conventions.

  • 25-April-2018

    English

    Making Development Co-operation Work for Small Island Developing States

    Small Island Developing States (SIDS) stand at a critical juncture on their paths to sustainable development. Economic growth, human development and vulnerability indicators point to specific challenges facing SIDS, and suggest that new development solutions and approaches are needed to chart the course to prosperity for their people and their environments. Building on a number of innovative sources of data, such as the OECD Surveys on Private Finance Mobilised and on Philanthropy, in addition to OECD DAC statistics and other sources, this report examines the financing for development resources – domestic and external – available to SIDS. It provides new evidence on sources, destination, and objectives of development finance in SIDS. It highlights innovative approaches and good practices that the international community could replicate, further develop, and scale up in order to make development co-operation work for SIDS, helping them set on a path of sustainable development.
  • 20-April-2018

    English

    Romania becomes Participant in the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC)

    Romania became a Participant in the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) on 5 April 2018. As a provider of substantial concessional finance for development co-operation and humanitarian aid, Romania will contribute to the DAC’s discussions and work on key development and humanitarian issues.

  • 17-April-2018

    English

    International Meeting on Triangular Co-operation

    This international meeting taking place on 17-18 April 2018 will bring together a wide range of practitioners and officials from the different actors involved in triangular co-operation.

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  • 12-April-2018

    English

    Amounts mobilised from the private sector for development

    The development community has shown wide interest in better understanding the mobilisation effect of public development finance. So far, three surveys have been launched by the DAC Secretariat (2013, 2015, 2016) with the objective of exploring the feasibility of measuring the amounts mobilised by public development finance in the DAC system. From 2017 on, reporting on amounts mobilised is included in regular reporting to OECD-DAC.

  • 9-April-2018

    English

    Development aid stable in 2017 with more sent to poorest countries

    Foreign aid from official donors totalled USD 146.6 billion in 2017, a small decrease of 0.6% from 2016 in real terms as less money was spent on refugees inside donor countries but with more funds flowing to countries most in need of aid, according to preliminary official data collected by the OECD.

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  • 26-March-2018

    English

    OECD Development Co-operation Peer Reviews: Australia 2018

    Australia has a strong voice on the global stage. It actively and consistently advocates for the interests of small island developing states and the Pacific region and on issues such as disaster risk reduction and gender equality. In line with this focus, the government has introduced a clear overarching policy vision and associated strategies and guidance for development co-operation. A robust performance framework reflects Australia’s strategic orientations, with value for money at the forefront. Among other issues, this review also looks at how the Australian government has managed the integration of aid within the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, and the resulting opportunities and challenges.
  • 23-March-2018

    English

    Private Philanthropy for Development

    Philanthropy’s role in advancing sustainable development attracts a lot of attention. This report calls into question long-held assumptions about the volume, nature and potential of foundations’ engagement in developing countries, and the role they can play to support the SDGs. It presents ground-breaking data and analysis that capture previously non-existent global and comparable quantitative and qualitative data on how foundations support development.The report examines philanthropic resource flows for development purposes, as well as foundations’ priorities, practices and partnering behaviours. It presents fresh perspectives and action-oriented recommendations to optimise philanthropy’s role in support of sustainable development.This report offers practical insights for government policy makers and decision makers in civil society organisations, social enterprises and foundations. It results from close co-operation between the OECD Development Centre’s Network of Foundations Working for Development (netFWD) and the OECD Development Co-operation Directorate.
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