Development Co-operation Directorate

Development Co-operation Report 2017: Data for Development - Further resources

 

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The 2017 volume of the  Development Co-operation Report focuses on Data for Development. “Big Data” and “the Internet of Things” are more than buzzwords: the data revolution is transforming the way that economies and societies are functioning across the planet.  Read full report.

 

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Development Co-operation Report 2017 HIGHLIGHTS



SIX ACTIONS FOR BETTER DEVELOPMENT DATA


Improving sustainable development data is a task for all. 

 With relatively little additional financial effort, development co-operation providers can fill the
estimated annual funding gap of USD 685 million for SDG data in developing countries. To achieve
this, aid for statistics needs to increase by about USD 200 million per year, beyond the 2015 level of
USD 541 million and sustain this up to 2030.


But, increasing the quantity of aid alone will not guarantee success. The quality of financing for
statistics must be improved by reducing duplication, targeting investments where needs are
greatest, ensuring everyone’s needs are counted, aligning to country priorities for data, and
providing more relevant and sustainable statistical capacity building.

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CASE STUDIES
 

The Development Co-operation Report 2017 recognises that development partners need to seize the unique opportunity presented by the era of big data, and the political impetus from the Sustainable Development Goals in order to make data work for development.  Efforts are already underway across a wide variety of stakeholders. These case studies show case a few initiatives and highlight successes and potential areas of focus to make the most of this opportunity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

WORKING PAPER: DAC MEMBERS PRIORITIES AND CHALLENGES

_01_DCR_WPcover.jpgDemand for strong data has never been so high: countries need high-quality, timely, reliable and disaggregated data to measure their progress against the Sustainable Development Goals. At the same time, the world has never produced so much data: modern technology, big data and the internet of things has resulted in unprecedented amounts of data being produced. However, much of these data remain unanalysed and under-utilised. What needs to be done to bring supply and demand together to bring tangible development outcomes to all people across the planet? This paper, informed by a survey circulated among DAC members between February and April 2017, provides a picture of DAC members’ policies and practices to support national statistical capacities and systems in developing countries. It highlights some of the main challenges that DAC members face in relation to making data work for sustainable development. The findings from this paper will inform the analysis of the 2017 Development Co-operation Report on Data for Development.

 

 

 

 

PROFILES OF PROVIDERS OF DEVELOPMENT CO-OPERATION

_01_DCR_CPcoverWhere do countries spend their ODA and what do they spend it on?The profiles have the latest analysis of these flows. The overview chapter analyses the collective performance of DAC members’ ODA and concessional finance. The profiles present key facts on DAC member policies, priorities and practices to make data work for development - the special theme for the 2017 Development Co-operation Report.

The DAC members profiled in the report are:

Australia | Austria  | Belgium  | Canada  | Czech Republic  | Denmark  | EU institutions  | Finland  | France  | Germany  | Greece  | Hungary  | Iceland  | Ireland  | Italy  | Japan  | Korea  | Luxembourg  | Netherlands  | New Zealand  | Norway  | Poland  | Portugal  | Slovak Republic  | Slovenia  | Spain  | Sweden  | Switzerland  | United Kingdom  | United States

The chapter profiling other providers of development co-operation features data for: Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, Chinese Taipei, Croatia, Cyprus, Estonia, Gates Foundation, Kazakhstan, Kuwait Fund for Arab Economic Development, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Malta, Romania, Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, Thailand, Timor-Leste. It also features estimates for ten countries who do not report their development finance flows to the DAC: Brazil, Chile, People's Republic of China, Colombia, Costa Rica, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Qatar and South Africa.

 

WHAT DO THE ODA FIGURES TELL US?

‌Development finance has never been higher: In 2016 official development assistance from the DAC reached 142.6bn USD, and 155 bn USD including countries outside of the DAC. With more resources on offer, are donors meeting their commitments to the poorest and those most in need? Find out more

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WANT MORE DATA VIZ? DOWNLOAD POSTERS ON ODA

‌ODA and Beyond: How much does your country contribute? Net resource flows to developing countries

ODA: Where do you spend it? Main recipients of bilateral ODA in 2014-15

How gender sensitive is your aid?

ODA: How much do you support environmental goals?

ODA: How do you spend it? (Composition of bilateral ODA)

ODA from countries beyond the DAC membership

 

BLOGS AND ARTICLES ON DATA FOR DEVELOPMENT

22 March 2017, International Development: Poor data holds back human progress, DW (Deutsche Welle)

8 December 2017, More and Better Financing for Data to Achieve the SDGs, Jenna Slotin, Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data

20 October 2017, Closing the gender gap requires closing the data gap, Sarah Hendriks, Director, Gender Equality, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

19 October 2017, OECD outlines six data actions for sustainable development, Open Data Watch

17 October 2017, With great data comes great responsibility, Charlotte Petri Gornitzka, Jorge Moreira da Silva, OECD.

10 October 2017, Improving sustainable development data is a task for all, Martine Durand, OECD.

19 June 2017, Will big data transform development? Jorge Moreira da Silva, Ida Mc Donnell, OECD, Johannes Jütting, PARIS21.

 

PREVIOUS EDITIONS

2016: The Sustainable Development Goals as Business Opportunities

2015: Making Partnerships Effective Coalitions for Action

2014: Mobilising Resources for Sustainable Development

2013: Ending Poverty

 

KEEP IN TOUCH

 
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