Latest Documents


  • 20-February-2018

    English

    Illicit Financial Flows - The Economy of Illicit Trade in West Africa

    This report is a first step towards building a qualitative understanding of the way illicit or criminal activities interact with the economy, security and development of West African states. Going beyond a traditional analysis of illicit financial flows (IFFs), which typically emphasises the scale of monetary flows, the report examines the nature of thirteen overlapping, and oftentimes mutually reinforcing, criminal and illicit economies, with a view to identify their resulting financial flows and development linkages. In taking this approach, this report identifies the networks and drivers that allow these criminal economies to thrive, with a particular emphasis on the actors and incentives behind them. As a conclusion to this work, this report proposes a series of policy considerations to assist countries to prioritise and focus their responses to reduce the development impacts of IFFs. Resolving the problem of IFFs requires responding to underlying development challenges, and tackling all parts of the problem in source, transit and destination countries.
  • 15-September-2016

    English

    Governance Support

    The Governance team facilitates exchanges between governance practitioners and experts to explore and promote better governance in developing countries.

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  • 15-September-2016

    English

    Economic and Financial Crime

    Economic and financial crime, faced by donors and developing countries alike is a major obstacle to development. Resources that could support a country’s development are lost through criminal acts like corruption, tax evasion, money laundering, and others.

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  • 15-September-2016

    English

    Public Sector Governance and Institutions

    The OECD brings together public sector governance experts from developing as well as developed countries to shape international policy debates on these issues and to support innovation at country level.

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  • 17-November-2015

    English

    A Governance Practitioner’s Notebook

    The Governance Practitioner’s Notebook takes an unusual approach for the OECD-DAC Network on Governance (GovNet). It brings together a collection of specially written notes aimed at those who work as governance practitioners within development agencies.

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  • 11-September-2014

    English

    Few and Far - The Hard Facts on Stolen Asset Recovery

    Corruption has a devastating impact on developing and transition countries, with estimates of $20 billion to $40 billion per year stolen by public officials, a figure equivalent to 20 to 40 percent of official development assistance flows. The return of the proceeds of corruption— asset recovery—can have a significant development impact. Returns can be used directly for development purposes, such as improvements in the health and education sectors and reintegration of displaced persons, with additional benefits of improved international co-operation and enhanced capacity of law enforcement and financial management officials. Development agencies and those committed to development effectiveness have a role in the asset recovery process. They have made international commitments to fight corruption and recover the proceeds of corruption in the Third High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness: Accra Agenda for Actions, held in Accra, Ghana, in 2008, and in the Fourth High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness: Partnership for Effective Development, held in Busan, Republic of Korea, in 2011. Despite these efforts, there has been difficulty in translating these commitments into concrete action. This StAR-OECD publication reports on how OECD countries are performing on asset recovery.Drawing on data collected between 2006 and 2012, the report provides recommendations and good practices, and suggests specific actions for development agencies. Few and Far is primarily intended to support the anti-corruption and asset recovery efforts of developed and developing jurisdictions, with a particular focus on actions for development agencies. In addition, civil society organisations engaged in governance and development issues may wish to use these findings and recommendations in their reports and advocacy efforts.
  • 18-December-2013

    English, PDF, 2,452kb

    Illicit Financial Flows from Developing Countries: Measuring OECD Responses

    Strengthening OECD firewalls can only do so much to combat a phenomenon which thrives on weak governance. This report highlights that donor agencies can support this goal through their central role in linking OECD and developing countries, and using their aid to support governments willing to tackle these issues.

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  • 23-February-2012

    English

    International Drivers of Corruption - A Tool for Analysis

    Corruption and other governance problems result primarily from processes generated within the domestic political economy. There are major international factors, however, that interact with domestic processes: international drivers of corruption.   This report introduces an analytical tool to help readers understand how these international drivers of corruption affect governance and corruption at the country level. It provides a means for identifying those drivers that matter most for domestic governance, as well as opportunities for international actors to work more effectively to improve governance in specific country contexts.
  • 15-December-2011

    English, Excel, 1,557kb

    International Drivers of Corruption

    This report introduces an analytical tool intended to help users understand how factors in the global economy and international relations, affect governance and corruption at the country level.

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  • 15-December-2011

    English, , 4,287kb

    Accra Stolen Asset report

    Tracking Anti-Corruption and Asset Recovery Commitments:A Progress Report and Recommendations for Action

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