Transfer pricing

1 Background - 1.1. What is a tax convention - 1.1.2. Double taxation - juridical and economic

 

 

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1. Background

1.1. What is a tax convention?

1.1.2. Double taxation - juridical and economic

International juridical double taxation can be defined as the imposition of income taxes in two (or more) states on the same taxpayer in respect of the same income .  Juridical double taxation can arise, for example, where a resident of one country derives income from sources in the other country, and both countries’ domestic tax legislation would tax that income.  It can also arise where each country considers the taxpayer to be resident in that country under domestic tax laws.  Tax conventions reduce juridical double taxation by allocating taxing rights between residence and source states on various categories of income, typically by eliminating or limiting source country taxation or by requiring a residence state to grant relief for source state taxation through a credit or exemption mechanism.  For example, tax conventions typically provide that one country may not tax the business profits earned by a resident of the other country unless that resident has a taxable presence in the form of a permanent establishment in the first country and the profits are attributable to that permanent establishment.  Tax conventions also reduce juridical double taxation by establishing criteria for determining an exclusive residency status for taxpayers.  The most common instances of juridical double taxation disputes are disputes over residency or permanent establishment status, or over the characterisation of particular items of income and their coverage under particular provisions of the convention.

Economic double taxation means the inclusion, by more than one state’s tax administration, of the same income in the tax base when the income is in the hands of different taxpayers.  Transfer pricing cases are the best example of economic double taxation.  For example, a tax administration adjusts a price charged between related parties with a resulting tax charged on the additional income in the hands of one related party, where tax has already been charged in another country on that same income in the hands of the other related party.   

Double taxation has a detrimental effect on the movements of capital, technology and persons and on the exchange of goods and services.  Thus tax conventions, when properly applied, remove the obstacles of double taxation, thereby promoting the development and flow of international trade and investment.

 

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