By Date


  • 30-September-2017

    English

    Illicit Financial Flows - Illicit Trade and Development Challenges in West Africa

    This report shows how criminal economies and illicit financial flows through and within West Africa affect people’s lives. It goes beyond the traditional analysis of illicit financial flows, which focuses on the value of monetary flows. The report exposes the ways in which criminal and illicit activities and resulting illicit financial flows damage governance, the economy, development and security. It presents case studies based on concrete examples from West Africa of human trafficking, drug smuggling, counterfeit goods, gold mining and terrorism financing. It identifies networks and drivers – in the region or elsewhere – that allow these criminal economies to thrive, by feeding and facilitating these activities and the circulation of illicitly-obtained revenue. It also examines the impacts on local communities, such as changes in wealth distribution, power dynamics and the degree to which illicit money undermines social organisation.

    This book proposes a policy framework for both source and destination countries of illicit flows that looks beyond the concerns of developed countries to enhance development prospects at the local level and respond to the needs of the most vulnerable stakeholders. Combating criminal economies and preventing illicit financial flows will require sustained partnerships between producing and consuming countries. West Africa cannot be expected to address these challenges alone.

  • 10-April-2017

    English

    High-Level Advisory Group on Anti-Corruption and Integrity

    The OECD Secretary-General’s High Level Advisory Group on Anti-Corruption and Integrity (HLAG) is composed of experts on anti-corruption and integrity from a wide variety of professional backgrounds and regions. The members have provide their advice to the Secretary-General independently, without any vested interests in the outcome.

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  • 10-April-2017

    English, PDF, 888kb

    High-Level Advisory Group on Anti-Corruption and Integrity Report to the OECD Secretary-General 2017

    10/04/2017 - This document reproduces a report prepared by the High-Level Advisory Group which delivers recommendations on ways the OECD can strengthen its work on combating bribery and promoting integrity. The Secretary-General formally received this report and its recommendations during the 2017 OECD Global Anti-Corruption and Integrity Forum.

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  • 7-April-2017

    English

    Advisory Group on Anti-Corruption and Integrity Delivers Recommendations for OECD

    An independent group of leading anti-corruption and integrity experts recommends doing more to enforce and develop anti-corruption standards and enhancing collaboration with other international organisations in a report on ways the OECD can strengthen its vital work in combating bribery and promoting integrity.

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  • 30-March-2017

    English

    2017 OECD Global Anti-Corruption & Integrity Forum

    The 2017 OECD Global Anti-Corruption and Integrity Forum will tackle issues related to fair competition and economic growth, the inequality gap, a level playing field for business, the public interest in policy making and trust in government and politics

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  • 30-March-2017

    English

    In the Public Interest: Taking Integrity to Higher Standards - opening remarks at the 2017 OECD Global Anti-Corruption & Integrity Forum

    Welcome to the 5th edition of the OECD Global Anti-Corruption and Integrity Forum. Let me begin by thanking the Prime Minister of Slovakia, Mr. Robert Fico, and the Vice President of Nigeria, Professor Yemi Osinbajo, for joining us for this opening.

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  • 30-March-2017

    English

    Preventing Policy Capture - Integrity in Public Decision Making

    This report exposes how “policy capture”, where public decisions over policies are consistently or repeatedly directed away from the public interest towards a specific interest, can exacerbate inequalities and undermine democratic values, economic growth and trust in government. It maps out the different mechanisms and risks of policy capture, and provides guidance for policy makers on how to mitigate these risks through four complementary strategies: engaging stakeholders with diverging interests; ensuring transparency and access to information; promoting accountability; and identifying and mitigating the risk of capture through organisational integrity policies.

  • 30-March-2017

    English

    OECD Integrity Review of Mexico - Taking a Stronger Stance Against Corruption

    The OECD's Integrity Review of Mexico is one of the first peer reviews to apply the new 2017 Recommendation of the Council on Public Integrity. It assesses i) the coherence and comprehensiveness of the evolving public integrity system; ii) the extent to which Mexico’s new reforms cultivate a culture of integrity across the public sector; and iii) the effectiveness of increasingly stringent accountability mechanisms. In addition, the Review includes a sectoral focus on public procurement, one of the largest areas of government spending in the country and is considered a high-risk government activity for fraud and corruption. The OECD finds that Mexico’s recent integrity reforms have the potential to be "game-changers" in the country’s fight against corruption, however, ensuring successful implementation remains the main challenge going forward. As such, the Review provides several proposals for action aimed at strengthening institutional arrangements and improving vertical and horizontal co-ordination, closing remaining gaps in various existing legal/policy frameworks (protection for whistle-blowers, risk management, administrative disciplinary procedures, etc.), as well as supporting awareness-raising and capacity-building efforts to instill integrity values and ensure the sustainability of reforms.

  • 28-March-2017

    English

    One in five mobile phones shipped abroad is fake

    Nearly one in five mobile phones and one in four video game consoles shipped internationally is fake, as a growing trade in counterfeit IT and communications hardware weighs on consumers, manufacturers and public finances, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 24-March-2017

    English

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