Articles


  • 16-June-2015

    English

    Striving for excellence – international sporting events we can be proud of

    This blog post John Morrison, Executive Director of the Institute for Human Rights and Business, discusses what the social responsibilities of sporting events should be and argues for greater oversight and due diligence at every stage of the mega-sporting events delivery process.

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  • 14-June-2015

    English

    As demands for better human rights reporting grow fast, help is at hand

    This blog post discusses how the UN Guiding Principles Reporting Framework, introduced in February 2015, help companies provide evidence of how they are conducting human rights due diligence: the process of assessing and addressing their human rights impacts, and tracking and communicating how well they do so.

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  • 24-April-2015

    English

    Rethinking due diligence practices in the apparel supply chain

    Two years ago today, the Rana Plaza building in Bangladesh’s capital Dhaka collapsed, killing over 1,100 people and injuring another 2,500. The dead and injured were garment workers. This blog post looks at due diligence in the apparel supply chain.

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  • 15-April-2015

    English

    Legislation on responsible business conduct must reinforce the wheel, not reinvent it

    This article by Roel Nieuwenkamp talks about the trend of hardening of soft law in the domain of responsible business conduct. It argues that legislative proposals related to existing international instruments should not seek to reinvent the wheel, but to reinforce it. Existing instruments that are widely recognised and proven to be effective and reasonable should represent a foundation for their legally-binding counterparts.

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  • 13-April-2015

    English

    Holding business to account

    The promotion of responsible business conduct has taken an important step forward with the launch of a new reporting framework. Businesses now have no excuse for not explaining how they’re meeting their human rights obligations.

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  • 24-March-2015

    English

    Responsible gold also means supporting livelihoods of artisanal miners

    Today the discourse on “conflict minerals” has changed. It’s not just about conflict-free, it's about promoting responsible sourcing of minerals from conflict areas, despite the challenges. This blog discusses the urgent need to create responsible supply chains of artisanal gold, and support the livelihoods of miners in the informal gold industry, and how OECD guidance can help companies do this.

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  • 13-February-2015

    English, PDF, 1,273kb

    The Dark Horse, The Paper Tiger and Chicken Little: Lessons from the OECD Foreign Bribery Report

    One of the more startling findings in the OECD Foreign Bribery Report, is that some level of corporate management was involved in over 50% of the cases sanctioned. This paper by Leah Ambler, published in the Journal of Business Compliance (01/2015), examines what went wrong and why from a corporate governance and compliance perspective.

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  • 13-November-2014

    English

    Business and the G20: Momentum for reform must be a priority

    BIAC has been advising the OECD for over 50 years on policies that should lead to private sector-led growth, and has been actively involved in the B8 and B20 process since its inception.

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  • 27-May-2013

    English

    Failing to close the stable door

    The recent scandal over the use of horsemeat in readymade meals that has shaken the entire European continent has revealed not only the complexity and opacity of our food supply chain, but also–and above all–the shortcomings of European food law.

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  • 17-May-2013

    English

    Boardrooms in transition

    Recent years have brought a flood of stories about dubious standards in business. In the past, many of these might not have impinged on the public’s consciousness. But in today’s interconnected world, consumers and stakeholders are raising the bar for what’s acceptable in corporate behaviour. It’s up to boards and board members to ensure that businesses meet those expectations.

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