Abuse of dominance and monopolisation

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Recent roundtable releases include: Ex officio Cartel Investigations, Food Chain Industry and Waste Management Services. See also all other best practice roundtable discussions.
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Targeting the tourism, retail trade, food processing and construction materials sectors, this report identifies hundreds of competition-distorting rules and provisions.
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16-17 September 2014, Uruguay: Discussions will focus on Electricity markets in Latin America, Advocacy and Costa Rica's Competition Regime.
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What is abuse of dominance o‌r monopolisation?

A firm’s ability to raise its prices is usually constrained by competitors and the possibility that its customers can switch to alternative sources of supply. When these constraints are weak, a firm is said to have market power and if the market power is great enough, to be in a position of dominance or monopoly (the precise terminology differs according to the jurisdiction). While mere possession of monopoly power does not in itself constitute violation of competition laws, the abuse of such power  - particularly if it is used to weaken competition further by excluding rivals - calls for intervention from competition authorities.

    

Chess game symbolizing dominance

  

Detecting abuse of dominance

Determing when a firm’s behaviour is an abuse of market power, as opposed to a competitive action, is one of the most complex and controversial areas in competition  policy.  Competition laws typically contain provisions prohibiting abuse of market power by dominant firms or attempts of not yet dominant firms to monopolise markets.

 

However, there is considerable divergence among jurisdictions about the precise definition of dominance, the range of practices and conducts that should be condemned as anti-competitive, and finally the choice of remedies that should be imposed.

Examples of abusive practices typically include:

  • predatory pricing
  • loyalty rebates
  • tying and bundling
  • refusals to deal
  • margin squeeze
  • excessive pricing

‌A proper understanding of when a firm’s actions could be considered abusive is important for competition authorities because consumers’and the economy would be harmed by an incorrect intervention. A firm with a large market share, which might be considered dominant, also needs to understand the law and economics in this area, which is not always easy.

 

To promote effective enforcement of competition laws in the area of abuse of dominance and monopolisation, the OECD Competition Committee holds roundtable discussions, typically with the participation of businesses, academics and other interested participants.  As a result, Best Practice Roundtables proceedings are published to provide some guidance to best practices in this area, at the cutting edge of applied competition law and policy.


For further information on the OECD work related to abuse of dominance and monopolisation, please contact us at DAFCOMPContact@oecd.org.

 
BEST PRACTICE ROUNDTABLES ON COMPETITION LAW AND POLICY

Latest releases available on Abuse of Dominance

Enhanced Enforcement Co-operation, 2014 (Hearing)

Role and Measurement of Quality in Competition Analysis, 2013 (pdf)

Competition Issues in Television and Broadcasting, 2013

The Digital Economy, 2012 (pdf)

Market Definition, 2012 (pdf)

Procedural Fairness and Transparency, 2012

Excessive Prices,2011 (pdf)

The Regulated Conduct Defence, 2011 (pdf)


List of all roundtable releases on Abuse of Dominance

Permanent URL: www.oecd.org/competition/abuse

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