By Date


  • 11-December-2015

    English

    Update on Overseas Investments by China's National Oil Companies - Achievements and Challenges since 2011

    Chinese NOCs first ventured overseas to invest in oil and gas production more than 20 years ago. Today, they have emerged to become international players with activities spreading across more than 40 countries and producing 2.5 million barrels of oil equivalent per day (mboe/d) of oil and gas outside of China. Chinese companies have contributed much-needed investments in global oil and gas production.

    This report provides an update on overseas activity by China’s National Oil Companies (NOCs) between 2011 and 2013 and is a follow-up publication of IEA’s previous report in 2011, Overseas Investments by Chinese National Oil Companies: Assessing the Drivers and Impacts. It aims to examine the trends exhibited by investments made by Chinese NOCs and the risks and challenges they face today and raised the question if China’s long standing non-interference foreign policy could still be valid given China’s worldwide commercial interests, including those of the NOCs’.

  • 11-December-2015

    English

    Gas Pricing: China's Challenges and IEA Experience

    China will play a positive role in the global development of gas, the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) Executive Director, Maria Van der Hoeven has said in Beijing on 11 September, 2012 when launching a new IEA report: Gas Pricing and Regulation, China’s challenges and IEA experiences.

    In line with its aim to meet growing energy demand while shifting away from coal, China has set an ambitious goal of doubling its use of natural gas from 2011 levels by 2015. Prospects are good for significant new supplies – both domestic and imported, conventional and unconventional – to come online in the medium-term, but notable challenges remain, particularly concerning gas pricing and the institutional and regulatory landscape.
     
    While China’s circumstances are, in many respects unique, some current issues are similar to those a number of IEA countries have faced. This report highlights some key challenges China faces in its transition to greater reliance on natural gas, then explores in detail relevant experiences from IEA countries, particularly in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and the United States as well as the European Union (EU). Preliminary suggestions about how lessons learned in other countries could be applied to China’s situation are offered as well.
     
    The aim of this report is to provide stakeholders in China with a useful reference as they consider decisions about the evolution of the gas sector in their country.
     
    The report is funded by the UK Strategic Programme Fund programme , and the EU delegation in Beijing and the World Bank have provided in-kind contributions. The project is supported by the Chinese government and co-implemented by China 5E.
     

  • 11-December-2015

    English

    Emissions Reduction through Upgrade of Coal-Fired Power Plants: Learning from Chinese Experience

    Coal is the principal fuel for the generation of electrical power globally. It is the leading source of power generation in OECD countries and the dominant fuel source behind economic growth in non-OECD countries. However, while providing over 40% of the world’s electricity, it is responsible for more than 70% of the CO2 arising from electricity generation.

    The IEA carried out a project to examine the potential to improve the performance of existing coal-fired plants. Two power units in China were selected to showcase measures that would improve their net efficiency. The results built on the efficiency gains made under China’s national energy efficiency improvement programme and demonstrated the enormous potential to improve performance, with each percentage point increase capable of reducing CO2 emissions by many millions of tonnes over a unit’s operational lifetime. Experiences learned in China can be applied to improving coal-fired power plant efficiency worldwide.

  • 1-July-2015

    English

    Visit by Chinese Premier Li Keqiang to the OECD in Paris on 1st July 2015

    H.E. Li Keqiang, Premier of the State Council of the People’s Republic of China, paid a historic visit to the OECD to deliver a keynote address and sign cooperation agreements to bolster ongoing collaboration.

  • 1-July-2015

    English

    China signs cooperation agreements with OECD and joins OECD Development Centre

    In a historic visit by Chinese Premier Li Keqiang to the OECD in Paris, the People’s Republic of China today decided to enhance longstanding collaboration with the OECD and to join the OECD Development Centre.

    Related Documents
  • 1-July-2015

    English

    OECD Development Centre and China

    China is joining a group of 48 OECD and non-OECD countries that are members of the OECD Development Centre. The Centre helps decision makers find policy solutions to stimulate growth and improve living conditions in developing and emerging economies. China is also an OECD Key Partner, like Brazil, India, Indonesia, and South Africa, which are already members of the OECD Development Centre.

  • 1-July-2015

    English

  • 1-July-2015

    English

    中华人民共和国加入经合组织发展中心

    中华人民共和国加入经合组织发展中心

  • 1-July-2015

    English

    Visit of H.E. Li Keqiang, Premier of China - Introductory remarks

    It is an honour to welcome the Premier of the State Council of the People’s Republic of China to the OECD. Your visit, Premier Li, marks 20 years of fruitful partnership between China and the OECD. It reflects our deepening collaboration and our growing trust.

  • 25-June-2015

    English

    Taxing Energy Use 2015: Key Findings for China

    Taxation is a key tool by which governments can influence energy use to contain its environmental impacts. This report provides a systematic analysis of the structure and level of energy taxes in OECD and selected other countries, including China; together, they cover 80% of global energy use.

  • << < 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 > >>