Reports


  • 31-May-2016

    English, PDF, 1,086kb

    How's life in Chile?

    This note presents selected findings based on the set of well-being indicators published in How's Life? 2016.

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  • 31-May-2016

    English

    Chile - OECD Anti-Bribery Convention

    This page contains all information relating to implementation of the OECD Anti-Bribery Convention in Chile.

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  • 21-May-2016

    English

    Digital Government in Chile - Strengthening the Institutional and Governance Framework

    This review analyses the governance and institutional framework of digital government in Chile. It is based on the OECD Recommendation on Digital Government Strategies. It first benchmarks the institutional arrangements of ten advanced countries in the field of digital government, assessing their strategies, digital government units or bodies and policy levers, as well as the co-ordination mechanisms in place. The review then provides an in-depth look at the institutional set-up of digital government in Chile. The assessment reveals that the governance of digital government in Chile would benefit from a stronger legal basis, providing the unit leading the work on digital government with a better grounding and the necessary levers to drive the digital transformation of government and public services. Based on this analysis, the OECD advances two alternative recommendations to strengthen the institutional framework of digital government to foster public sector productivity, enhance efficiencies and improve service delivery. The strengths and weaknesses of the alternatives discussed in detail. The review includes a roadmap for the implementation of both alternatives.

     

  • 25-April-2016

    English

    Regulatory Policy in Chile - Government Capacity to Ensure High-Quality Regulation

    One of Chile’s biggest strengths is its very sound macroeconomic framework that reinforces its economic resilience. This is partly based on a prudent regulatory and supervisory framework governing the financial system. Furthermore, the government’s Agenda for Productivity, Innovation and Growth, co-ordinated by the Ministry of Economy with the participation of other ministries and state services, constitutes a good opportunity to use regulatory policy as a driver to reform the policymaking framework of Chile. For example, Chile has already made substantive progress in making regulations more accessible and communicating administrative requirements. However, while in Chile national regulations provide the general framework for administrative procedures and an efficient state administration, the lack of a comprehensive regulatory reform programme has reduced the possibility of achieving even better economic outcomes and unleashing resources to boost productivity. The regulatory policymaking framework lacks some key features seen in other OECD countries (e.g. stakeholder engagement, regulatory impact assessment, oversight body) that would make sure that regulations are designed in the best way. Good practices in rule-making procedures are also rather limited. This review presents the way forward for improving the government’s capacity to ensure high-quality regulation in Chile.

  • 10-March-2016

    English

    Progress in Chile's Supreme Audit Institution - Reforms, Outreach and Impact

    This report is a progress review on the implementation of key OECD recommendations made in the 2014 Public Governance Review of the Office of the Comptroller General of Chile (the CGR). It takes stock of the CGR’s recent activities in key areas – stakeholder engagement, support to internal control and rebalancing its audit portfolio – and assesses their impact based on consultation with CGR officials and external stakeholders of the Chilean executive, legislature and civil society.

  • 4-March-2016

    English, PDF, 6,480kb

    Diagnostic of Chile’s Engagement in Global Value Chains

    This OECD report lays an empirical foundation for structuring economic policies to facilitate Chile’s participation in global value chains and to maximise the associated benefits for national firms and workers.

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  • 16-February-2016

    English

    OECD Review of Fisheries: Country Statistics 2015

    This publication contains statistics on fisheries in OECD member countries (with the exception of Austria) and some non-member economies (Argentina, People's Republic of China, Colombia, Indonesia, Latvia, Lithuania, Peru, Russian Federation, South Africa, Chinese Taipei, and Thailand) from 2007 to 2014. Data provided concern fishing fleet capacity, employment in fisheries, fish landings, aquaculture production, recreational fisheries, government financial transfers, and imports and exports of fish.

     

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  • 10-February-2016

    Spanish, PDF, 304kb

    Estudiantes de bajo rendimiento: Chile (ESP)

    En 2012, 52% de los estudiantes de Chile tuvo un bajo rendimiento en matemáticas (media OCDE: 23%), un 33% en lectura (media OCDE: 18%), un 34% en ciencias (media OCDE: 18%), y un 25% en las tres materias (media OCDE: 12%).

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  • 4-February-2016

    English

    Chile - Financing Democracy: Funding of Political Parties and Election Campaigns and the Risk of Policy Capture

    This case study presents the proposed reforms to political funding and election oversight in the Republic of Chile put forth by the administration of President Michelle Bachelet. It details the measures to increase public funding, ensure transparency in finances, and create effective sanctions for violations.

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  • 18-January-2016

    English

    Chile: Policy Priorities for Stronger and More Equitable Growth

    Backed by strong economic growth Chile has made substantial progress in improving the quality of life of its citizens. Nonetheless, gaps in living standards vis-à-vis other OECD countries remain large and there are strong differences in well-being across the Chilean population. The government has introduced important steps to strengthen redistribution and improve equality of opportunities, including ambitious tax, labour and education reforms. But there is room to further improve the design of many policies to promote inclusiveness. Moreover, to sustain progress in well-being, Chile also needs faster productivity growth which stagnated until recently. This requires policies that foster competition, improve human capital accumulation and increase the diversification of the economy that still relies heavily on commodity exports.

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