Education


  • 4-April-2018

    English

    Getting Skills Right: Chile

    This study analyses the relationship between skills and labour market outcomes in Chile with a specific focus on disadvantaged groups: youth, women and the low-skilled. It examines the proficiency of the Chilean population in literacy, numeracy and problem solving in a technological-rich environment and disentangles the relationship between proficiency and labour market outcomes in Chile. The study also devotes significant attention to the demand for skills, by describing the use of skills at work in Chile and identifying its key determinants, as well as assessing the extent of skills mismatch and its implications for individuals. Throughout the study, differences between sociodemographic groups are highlighted to investigate the roots of labour market disadvantage.
  • 4-April-2018

    English

    Improving the skills of Chileans would boost productivity and inclusive growth

    Chile’s economy is strengthening and wage growth picking up. The country should now address the challenge of improving people’s skills, particularly among women and low-skilled workers, in order to boost productivity, innovation and inclusive growth, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 28-February-2018

    English, PDF, 345kb

    Chile Policy Brief: Strengthening the education and skills system of Chile

    In the context of rapid economic and demographic change, boosting everyone’s skills will be critical for productivity, innovation and inclusive growth in Chile.

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  • 1-December-2017

    English

    OECD Reviews of School Resources: Chile 2017

    This country review report for Chile provides, from an international perspective, an independent analysis of major issues facing the use of school resources in Chile, current policy initiatives, and possible future approaches. The report serves three purposes: i) to provide insights and advice to Chilean education authorities; ii) to help other countries understand the Chilean approach to the use of school resources; and iii) to provide input for the comparative analysis of the OECD School Resources Review. The analysis in the report focusses on the following areas: i) the funding of school education (including planning, distribution, incentives and monitoring); ii) equity resourcing policies targeted at specific groups of students; iii) school organisation and the operation of schools; and iv) the teaching profession.

  • 1-December-2017

    English

    OECD Reviews of School Resources: Chile 2017

    This country review report for Chile provides, from an international perspective, an independent analysis of major issues facing the use of school resources in Chile, current policy initiatives, and possible future approaches. The report serves three purposes: i) to provide insights and advice to Chilean education authorities; ii) to help other countries understand the Chilean approach to the use of school resources; and iii) to provide input for the comparative analysis of the OECD School Resources Review. The analysis in the report focusses on the following areas: i) the funding of school education (including planning, distribution, incentives and monitoring); ii) equity resourcing policies targeted at specific groups of students; iii) school organisation and the operation of schools; and iv) the teaching profession.
  • 30-November-2017

    English

    Education in Chile

    Chile’s education system can foster stronger economic, democratic and social development in the country. There are significant macroeconomic benefits to education, such as increased productivity. That said, individuals tend to benefit the most from high-quality, equitable education systems.In 2004, the OECD performed a review of national education policies and an analysis of the Chilean education system. This review aims to identify key changes in the Chilean education system mainly from 2004-16, in order to analyse where education in Chile stands today and offer recommendations to help provide better education opportunities for all Chileans in the coming years. The review therefore examines different areas of education policy in Chile, from early childhood education and care (ECEC) to higher education.
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  • 28-October-2016

    English

    Empowering the 40% of young Latin Americans not in formal jobs, education or training could spark new growth engines, says latest Latin American Economic Outlook

    Latin America and the Caribbean’s (LAC) GDP will shrink by between 0.9% and 1% in 2016, according to the latest estimates, the second consecutive year of negative growth and a rate of contraction the region has not seen since the early 1980s. According to the Latin American Economic Outlook 2017, the region should recover in 2017, but with modest GDP growth of between 1.5% and 2%, below expected growth in advanced economies.

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  • 28-June-2016

    English, PDF, 697kb

    Skills Matter: Further Results from the Survey of Adult Skills – Chile

    The Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC) directly measures proficiency in several information-processing skills – namely literacy, numeracy and problem solving in technology-rich environments.

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  • 24-June-2016

    English

    Improve skills to build fairer, more inclusive societies

    Poor skills severely reduce a person’s chance of a better-paying and more-rewarding job, and have a major impact on how the benefits of economic growth are shared within societies. In countries where large shares of adults have poor skills, it is difficult to introduce productivity-enhancing technologies and new ways of working, which stalls improvements in living standards, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 23-May-2016

    English

    On public education in Chile

    In 2011 the Social Movement for Public Education led the biggest demonstrations since Pinochet’s dictatorship in Chile. Since then, one of the main campaigns in Chilean society has been for the recognition of education as a social right, under the slogan of “free, quality, public education” (educación pública, gratuita y de calidad).

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