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  • 14-December-2020

    English

    Linking Indigenous Communities with Regional Development in Australia

    There are approximately 800,000 Indigenous Australians, which is 3.3% of Australia’s total population. Indigenous Australians are custodians of the world’s oldest living continuous culture and make a vital contribution to contemporary Australian society. Indigenous Australians are also important for the future of the national economy. For example, the amount of land with Indigenous ownership and interest has increased significantly in the last 50 years and now covers approximately half of Australia’s land mass. Indigenous Australians play an important role in the development of regional economies. Compared to the non-Indigenous population, Indigenous peoples are more likely to be located in predominantly rural regions. However, significant gaps in socio-economic outcomes with non-Indigenous Australians remain and these gaps are larger in rural regions. The report provides three key recommendations to improve economic outcomes for Indigenous Australians: improving the quality of the statistical framework and the inclusion of Indigenous peoples in the governance of data; promoting entrepreneurship to provide opportunities for Indigenous peoples to use assets and resources in ways that align with their objectives for development; and, implementing an approach to policies that is adapted to places, and empowers Indigenous institutions and communities.
  • 11-December-2020

    English

    Transport Bridging Divides

    Transport connects people, places and cities. Investment in transport infrastructure therefore helps bridging economic and social divides. It promotes economic growth and catching up of regions by providing access to jobs for workers and markets for firms. This report summarises evidence on the benefits of transport investment for economic growth and job creation and thereby for catching up in OECD regions. Beyond economic divides, the report consider inequality in access to opportunities using the EC-ITF-OECD Urban Access Framework. It considers how transport can bridge social divides by taking a closer look at accessibility within OECD cities (functional urban areas). Cities differ greatly in their ability to provide inclusive access to opportunities across more affluent and poorer neighbourhoods. To bridge divides, the report highlights the need to go beyond transport infrastructure investment and consider wider urban planning, as well as complementary measures in regions.
  • 11-December-2020

    English

    Overcoming administrative fragmentation for better mobility and accessibility - The case of the Madrid Autonomous Community

    Overcoming administrative fragmentation to build an integrated public transport network is one of the main actions taken in the Madrid Region to improve mobility. The lack of a regional development plan and the poor linkages between transport and urban development policies are, however, the main obstacles to fostering accessibility. The paper argues that a regional development plan and spatial planning to underpin transport investment decisions are needed to make the most of transport infrastructure and foster growth, well-being and effective environmental policies. This paper aims to reveal policy lessons from the experience of the Madrid Region in fostering urban mobility and accessibility, which could inspire policy change in other EU cities.
  • 11-December-2020

    English

    Improving Transport Planning for Accessible Cities

    Cities are places of opportunity. They provide not just jobs but a whole range of public, cultural, social and consumption amenities. Transport is what connects people to these opportunities and cities provide access with varying degrees of success – especially when it comes to modes of transport that favour a green transition. This report argues that building sustainable transport networks for accessible cities requires a holistic planning approach, a sound institutional framework, reliable sources of funding, strong governmental capacity, and should build on community engagement. Urban accessibility requires coherent allocation of responsibilities across levels of government to support strategic planning. The report proposes concrete actions that cities can take to adapt their institutional framework, to improve transport planning and ensure they have access to sustainable sources of funding to implement their plans.
  • 11-December-2020

    English

    Developing transit-oriented communities for better accessibility and affordability - The case of the Metro Vancouver Region

    The development of transit-oriented communities (TOC) is a central element in the promotion of accessibility in the Metro Vancouver Region (MVR). The entity is building on its wealth of experience in public transport development in the region, which has contributed to its high levels of well-being and economic progress. TOC aims to incentivise people to drive less and walk, cycle and take transit more. A solid culture of community engagement, the existence of a coordinating body for transport planning, and the links between transport and land-use policy are the main assets MVR has to enhance accessibility. However, tackling the affordable housing deficit around transport hubs remains a challenge for local authorities. The purpose of this paper is to draw lessons from the MVR’s experience in transit-oriented initiatives to contribute to the development of compact, connected and green urban centres.
  • 11-December-2020

    English

    Planning mobility in a fragmented metropolitan area - The case of Prague and its suburbs

    A common urban mobility plan for Prague and its metropolitan region as well as the creation of an integrated transport system coordinated by a central transport body are the main assets Prague can leverage to enhance accessibility. However, weak links to land use plans, the lack of enforceability of the mobility strategy, the absence of a transport component in the urban renewal strategy, and the high level of administrative fragmentation of the metro area limit the impact of the transport network in facilitating access to jobs and services. This paper aims at drawing policy lessons from Prague’s mobility strategy and suggesting recommendations that could improve its effectiveness in enhancing accessibility.
  • 4-December-2020

    English

    Roads, market access and regional economic development

    The increase in market access that the expansion of the road network and the growth of Europe created between 1990 and 2012 raised GDP, employment and attracted population. An increase in market access by 1% increases GDP in a region, on average, by 0.2%, employment by 0.7% and population by 0.6%. The positive effect of market access appears to be the strongest over long-distances, most likely based on trade links that are aided by better access to regions in other countries. Predominantly urban, intermediate and predominantly rural regions benefit equally from improvements in access, however, the investment required to create the same degree of improvement in the three types of regions varies substantially. Northern, Western and Central Europe benefited consistently from market access improvements. Southern European regions with better market access gained population and employment but lacked clear GDP improvements. Conversely, Eastern Europe lost employment and population for market access improvements that occurred in a 3-hour travel time radius but had the highest economic gains in GDP and GDP per capita, 1.7% and 2.2% respectively.
  • 3-December-2020

    English

    Preparing the Basque Country, Spain for the Future of Work

    COVID-19 is testing the Basque Country’s (Spain) resilience. Before COVID-19, employment indicators were recovering from the 2008 crisis, while automation of production was underway. Job quality remained low despite rising educational attainment in the region. COVID-19 is likely to accelerate structural changes in the labour market, including automation and digitalisation. Firms may increasingly look to technology as a way to pandemic proof their operations, while individuals may develop preferences for automated services as opposed to face to face contact. This OECD report sheds light on the potential impacts of automation on the Basque labour market, including which types of jobs and groups of workers are most likely to be impacted, in light of COVID-19 and other labour market changes. The report also highlights the critical role to be played by employment services, training policies and social dialogue to help people and firms make labour market transitions while upholding social cohesion. The report delves into how the Basque Country’s employment and skills system can continue to be at the front line as the crisis evolves.
  • 1-December-2020

    English

    Increasing the job creation potential of Cultural and Creative Sectors and SPOTLIGHT: Covid-19 and Music & the Night Time Economy

    This webinar will provide guidance for the recovery by looking into the effects of the crisis on cultural employment, ways to better adapt employment, income and business support measures to the needs of the sector as well as measurement approaches to capture the true size of the sector to better inform policies.

  • 1-December-2020

    English

    Cultural participation and local resilience: Strategies for the recovery

    This policy webinar provided an opportunity to learn from latest academic evidence on the economic and social impacts of cultural participation, approaches to better capture it at regional level and instruments to increase it.

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