Reports


  • 17-November-2010

    English

    The Economic Impact of Export Restrictions on Raw Materials

    Export restrictions on raw materials are applied to achieve a number of policy objectives. However, they can have a significant and negative impact on the efficient allocation of resources, international trade, and the competitiveness and development of industries in both exporting and importing countries.  

    By diverting exports to domestic markets, export restrictions raise prices for foreign consumers and importers. At the same time, by reducing domestic prices in the applying countries and increasing global uncertainty concerning future prices, export restrictions negatively affect investment, thus potentially reducing the overall supply of raw materials in the long term. In view of existing alternative policy tools that have a different impact on trade, the effectiveness of export restrictions to achieve stated policy objectives should be carefully reviewed.  

    This publication presents a selection of papers discussed at the OECD Workshop on Raw Materials, held in Paris in October 2009. This workshop was organised in response to the growing concern on the use of export restrictions on raw materials, particularly by emerging economies.

  • 27-September-2010

    English

    Environmental Impacts of International Shipping: a Case Study of the Port of Vancouver

    As part of the project “Environmental Impacts of International Shipping: the role of ports”, this case study focuses on the way the port of metro Vancouver and the Canadian authorities address the environmental impacts of the port and its interactions with the hinterlands.

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  • 30-July-2010

    English

    Sickness, Disability and Work: Breaking the Barriers: Canada - Opportunities for Collaboration

    Sickness and disability policy reform has been a priority for OECD countries wanting to improve employment and social outcomes in this domain. The recent recession and corresponding fall in labour demand is expected to hit marginalised workers, including workers with health problems or disability, harder than the broader working-age population. There is a pressing need for policy makers to address the recent “medicalisation” of labour market problems, a phenomenon that appears to underlie much of the difficulties countries find in disability policy making. This report is an assessment of the Canadian situation, albeit through the lens of the federal government and the provinces of Québec, British Columbia and Manitoba. It looks at the current state of play following a decade of various reforms and preceding a period where further revisions are likely.
  • 7-June-2010

    English

    OECD Rural Policy Reviews: Québec, Canada

    This review examines Québec's rural policy approach, which aims at community empowerment and land occupancy, and presents recommendations for integrating social, economic and entrepreneurial development and implementing stabilisation measures in lagging areas.

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  • 13-April-2010

    English

    Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Canada 2009

    The International Energy Agency's periodic review of Canada's energy policies and programmes.  This 2010 edition finds that Canada, with its diverse and balanced portfolio of energy resources, is one of the largest producers and exporters of energy among IEA member countries. The energy sector plays an increasingly important role for the Canadian economy and for global energy security, as its abundant resource base has the potential to deliver even greater volumes of energy.  

    The federal, provincial and territorial governments of Canada are all strongly committed to the sustainable development of the country’s natural resources and have a long-standing and informed awareness of the need for each to contribute to the development of the energy sector. Furthermore, the government of Canada seeks to achieve a balance between the environmentally responsible production and use of energy, the growth and competitiveness of the economy, and secure and competitively priced energy and infrastructure.

    Nonetheless, the long-term sustainability of the sector remains a challenge. Due to climatic, geographic and other factors, Canada is one of the highest per-capita CO2 emitters in the OECD and has higher energy intensity than any IEA member country. A comprehensive national energy efficiency strategy, coupled with a coordinated climate change policy targeted at the key emitting sectors, is needed.  

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a priority for the federal government and presents Canada with an opportunity to develop a new technology that can reduce greenhouse gas emissions on a large scale. The IEA recommends that Canada provide international leadership in the development of CCS technology.  

    This review analyses the energy challenges facing Canada and provides sectoral critiques and recommendations for further policy improvements.

  • 13-April-2010

    English, , 498kb

    Successful Practices and Policies to Promote Regulatory Reform and Entrepreneurship, British Columbia, Canada

    The following case study describes successful practices of regulatory management and competitiveness enhancement in the state of British Columbia, Canada.

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  • 12-April-2010

    English

    Energy Policies of IEA Countries - Canada 2009 Review

    Canada, with its diverse and balanced portfolio of energy resources, is one of the largest producers and exporters of energy among IEA member countries.

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  • 8-April-2010

    English

    Tax Expenditures in OECD Countries - OECD publication

    This book sheds light on the use of tax expenditures, mainly through a study of ten OECD countries: Canada, France, Germany, Japan, Korea, Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States. It highlights key trends and successful practices.

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  • 11-March-2010

    English

    OECD Territorial Reviews: Toronto, Canada 2009

    OECD's Territorial Review of Toronto, Canada.  It finds that the Toronto region is one of the chief economic powerhouses of Canada, generating almost one-fifth of national GDP and 45% of Ontario’s GDP. The region is home to 40% of Canada’s business headquarters and is a main manufacturing hub, with major automotive, biomedical and electronics companies. Toronto is also one of the most diverse metropolitan regions in the world: half of its population is foreign born and it hosted 40% of all immigrants to Canada during 2001-2006.

    Nevertheless, the region’s current economic development model is under pressure and its economic performance has been mixed in recent years. From 1995 to 2005, GDP per capita and GDP growth rates were below the Canadian average while its annual economic and labour productivity growth were lower than the average for OECD metropolitan regions. During this period, population growth boosted demand in the construction, sales and retail, professional and financial services sectors. However, the recent decline in the area’s manufacturing jobs has illustrated the structural difficulties of some traditionally strong areas, such as the automotive and electronics industries.

    This Review proposes a new sustainable competitiveness agenda to enhance productivity, focusing on innovation, cultural diversity and infrastructure, as well as on green policies. To implement such an agenda, the Review proposes improving the current governance framework by intensifying strategic planning at the level of the Toronto region.

  • 10-March-2010

    English, , 116kb

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