Publications & Documents


  • 15-June-2016

    English

    The risks in Canada’s unusual housing market(s)

    Local housing markets are presently highly disparate in Canada. While in most smaller localities real estate prices are fairly stable and not out of line with the fundamentals (incomes and rents), 10 of the 15 large Census Metropolitan Areas monitored by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) show signs of overvaluation, and seven show moderate or strong evidence of overbuilding.

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  • 14-June-2016

    English

    Prospering in a Low-growth Era - Conference of Montreal Keynote Address

    Today’s theme – prospering in a low-growth era – suggests that growth rates have declined permanently and that we should focus on how to prosper in such new conditions. There are many problems facing us today not directly related to the pace of economic growth. Indeed, some challenges, like climate change, may actually be eased by slower growth.

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  • 13-June-2016

    English

    Mr. Angel Gurría, Secretary-General of the OECD, in Montreal from 12 to 15 June 2016

    The Secretary-General attended and made remarks at the Conference of Montreal “Shaping a New Era of Prosperity”, organised by the International Economic Forum of the Americas. He presented the 2016 OECD Economic Survey of Canada, alongside Mr. William Francis Morneau, Minister of Finance of Canada, and released a report on employment in Montreal with Mr. Denis Coderre, Mayor of Montreal.

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  • 13-June-2016

    English

    Canada is adjusting to the end of the commodities boom, but new policies are needed to boost productivity and reduce financial stability risks

    The Canadian economy is adjusting to the fall in commodity prices, but additional policies are needed to boost productivity, reduce financial stability risks and make future growth stronger, greener and more inclusive, according to a new OECD report.

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  • 13-June-2016

    English

    Economic Survey of Canada 2016

    The Canadian economy is adjusting to the fall in the terms of trade. The main challenges are to reduce financial stability risks, boost productivity growth and make growth greener and more inclusive.

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  • 13-June-2016

    English

    2016 Economic Survey of Canada

    I am delighted to be in Montreal to launch the 2016 Economic Survey of Canada. I would flag that we are today also releasing another report, in our Better Policies series, which looks at Canada’s policy performance across a broad range of areas, with recommendations in each. I handed a preliminary version of this report to Prime Minister Trudeau late last year, but we have been refining it since then and today are making it public.

  • 8-June-2016

    English

    OECD Secretary General Angel Gurría in Canada on 13-14 June - Economic Survey of Canada and Employment and Skills Strategy in Montreal

    The latest OECD Economic Survey of Canada, to be published on Monday 13 June, discusses how the Canadian economy is adjusting to the fall in commodity prices. The Survey assesses future growth and employment prospects as the economy shifts toward non-resource-based activity, including policies for accompanying this transition.

  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 432kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Medical Education and Training in Canada

    To become a doctor in Canada, a student can therefore expect 9 to 13 years of university education and post-graduate training, depending on the area of specialisation.

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  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 315kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Nursing Education in Canada

    In Canada, there are three main categories for nurses: Licenced Practice Nurses (LPNs), Registered Nurses (RNs) and Registered Psychiatric Nurses (RPNs). In addition, registered nurses can pursue further education to become Clinical Nurse Specialists and/or Nurse Practitioners.

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  • 7-March-2016

    English

    Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Canada 2015

    Canada has continued to harvest its vast natural resources and witnessed a shale revolution alongside rising oil sands production and investment in the energy sector over the past five years. The medium-term outlook for gas/oil production and exports, however, is challenging amid uncertainties around pipeline developments and an era of low prices, abundant global supplies and surging production in the United States, Canada’s main export market.

    Canada maintains the highest energy supply per capita among IEA member countries. Emissions from the oil and gas sectors increased by 14% in 2005-13, despite Canada’s low-carbon electricity mix (largely hydro and nuclear). The federal government, with the provinces, has put forward stringent energy efficiency and emission standards in the buildings, power and transport sectors, but not in industry. To strengthen its position as responsible energy supplier and user, Canada must take action to mitigate emissions and energy intensity. It can continue to develop its resources in a sustainable and cost-effective manner while balancing its economic and sustainability goals.

    Canada remains at the forefront of technological and regulatory innovation in unconventional oil and gas production and carbon capture and storage (CCS) with four large-scale CCS projects under way in 2015. The country has adopted ambitious climate targets at provincial and federal levels, but the federation is far from meeting its targets for 2020 and 2030. In July 2015, the Premiers of the provinces and territories agreed a Canadian Energy Strategy. The IEA urges the federal government to seize this opportunity for collective action to meet its 2030 goals and bring certainty to investment in clean-energy technologies and renewables.

    This in-depth review analyses the energy policy challenges facing Canada and provides recommendations for each energy sector, including advice for the implementation of the Canadian Energy Strategy.

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