Reports


  • 5-October-2016

    English, PDF, 502kb

    Society at a Glance 2016 - How does Australia compare?

    The number of young people not in employment, education or training (NEETs) remains elevated in many countries since the crisis. This country note examines the characteristics of those at risk of being NEET in Australia along with policies to help meet the challenge. It also includes many new youth-specific indicators on family formation, self-sufficiency, income and poverty, health and social cohesion.

  • 4-October-2016

    English, PDF, 834kb

    Monitoring Quality in Early Childhood Education and Care - Country Note (Australia)

    The monitoring quality in Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) country note for Australia is based on findings presented in the report of OECD (2015), Starting Strong IV: Monitoring Quality in Early Childhood Education and Care that covers 24 OECD member and non-member economies.

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  • 26-September-2016

    English, PDF, 512kb

    Environmental taxes: Key findings for Australia

    This country note provides an environmental tax and carbon pricing profile for Australia. It shows environmentally related tax revenues, taxes on energy use and effective carbon rates.

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  • 12-September-2016

    English

    Investing in Youth: Australia

    The present report on Australia is part of the series on "Investing in Youth", which builds on the expertise of the OECD on youth employment, social support and skills. This series covers both OECD countries and countries in the process of accession to the OECD, as well as some emerging economies. The report provides a detailed diagnosis of youth policies in the area of education, training, social and employment policies. Its main focus is on disengaged or at-risk of disengaged youth.

  • 31-May-2016

    English, PDF, 1,136kb

    How's life in Australia?

    This note presents selected findings based on the set of well-being indicators published in How's Life? 2016.

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  • 7-April-2016

    English

    Back to Work: Australia - Improving the Re-employment Prospects of Displaced Workers

    Job displacement (involuntary job loss due to firm closure or downsizing) affects many workers over their lifetime. Displaced workers may face long periods of unemployment and, even when they find new jobs, tend to be paid less and have fewer benefits than in their prior jobs. Helping them get back into good jobs quickly should be a key goal of labour market policy. This report is the fourth in a series of reports looking at how this challenge is being tackled in a number of OECD countries. It shows that many displaced workers get new jobs relatively quickly in Australia, mostly thanks to a flexible and dynamic labour market. A small minority of displaced workers receive special support via the labour adjustment programmes, but some displaced workers who would need specific assistance, in particular in the older worker and/or low-educated groups, do not get sufficient support or only too late. There is room to improve policies by moving away from the current sectoral approach to special assistance programmes for workers collectively dismissed, towards an approach covering all sectors of the economy, with the intensity of intervention tailored to the circumstances and needs of the displaced workers. Expanding the training component for displaced workers and making use of skills assessment and training to better target the training and enhance its effectiveness would also help displaced workers transition to sustainable jobs of a certain quality.

  • 15-March-2016

    English, PDF, 326kb

    Fact sheet: Trends in Nursing Education in Australia

    In Australia, there are two main categories for nurses: Enrolled Nurses (EN) (who, after an additional 6 months of studies, can become Endorsed Enrolled Nurses (EEN)) and Registered Nurses (RN). Graduates from RN programmes can pursue further education and training to become Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRN) or Nurse Practitioners (NP).

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  • 16-February-2016

    English

    OECD Review of Fisheries: Country Statistics 2015

    This publication contains statistics on fisheries in OECD member countries (with the exception of Austria) and some non-member economies (Argentina, People's Republic of China, Colombia, Indonesia, Latvia, Lithuania, Peru, Russian Federation, South Africa, Chinese Taipei, and Thailand) from 2007 to 2014. Data provided concern fishing fleet capacity, employment in fisheries, fish landings, aquaculture production, recreational fisheries, government financial transfers, and imports and exports of fish.

     

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  • 10-February-2016

    English, PDF, 274kb

    Low Performing Students: Australia

    In 2012, 20% of students in Australia were low performers in mathematics (OECD average: 23%), 14% were low performers in reading (OECD average: 18%), 14% were low performers in science (OECD average: 18%), and 9% were low performers in all three of these subjects (OECD average: 12%)

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  • 7-December-2015

    English

    Mental Health and Work: Australia

    Tackling mental ill-health of the working-age population is a key issue for labour market and social policies in OECD countries. OECD governments increasingly recognise that policy has a major role to play in keeping people with mental ill-health in employment or bringing those outside of the labour market back to it, and in preventing mental illness. This report on Australia is the ninth and last in a series of reports looking at how the broader education, health, social and labour market policy challenges identified in Sick on the Job? Myths and Realities about Mental Health and Work (OECD, 2012) are being tackled in a number of OECD countries. It concludes that policy thinking in Australia shows well-advanced awareness both of the costs of mental illness for society as a whole and of the health benefits of employment. However, challenges remain in: making employment issues a concern of the health care services; helping young people succees in their future working lives; making the workplace a safe, supportive psychosocial environment; and better designing and targeting employment services for jobseekers with mental ill-health.

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