Publications


  • 30-September-2017

    English

    Illicit Financial Flows - Illicit Trade and Development Challenges in West Africa

    This report shows how criminal economies and illicit financial flows through and within West Africa affect people’s lives. It goes beyond the traditional analysis of illicit financial flows, which focuses on the value of monetary flows. The report exposes the ways in which criminal and illicit activities and resulting illicit financial flows damage governance, the economy, development and security. It presents case studies based on concrete examples from West Africa of human trafficking, drug smuggling, counterfeit goods, gold mining and terrorism financing. It identifies networks and drivers – in the region or elsewhere – that allow these criminal economies to thrive, by feeding and facilitating these activities and the circulation of illicitly-obtained revenue. It also examines the impacts on local communities, such as changes in wealth distribution, power dynamics and the degree to which illicit money undermines social organisation.

    This book proposes a policy framework for both source and destination countries of illicit flows that looks beyond the concerns of developed countries to enhance development prospects at the local level and respond to the needs of the most vulnerable stakeholders. Combating criminal economies and preventing illicit financial flows will require sustained partnerships between producing and consuming countries. West Africa cannot be expected to address these challenges alone.

  • 29-September-2017

    English

    Improving Domestic Financial Support Mechanisms in Moldova's Water and Sanitation Sector

    The water supply and sanitation (WSS) sector in Moldova is not financially sustainable: tariffs do not typically cover operational costs and capital investments are heavily funded by external development partners. This report analyses several options for streamlining and strengthening domestic financial support mechanisms (DFSMs) in terms of both supply and demand, discusses different scenarios and recommends a number of actions to ensure effective DFSM implementation, notably: 1) sufficient investment for the implementation of targets and obligations set in the national strategies, the Association Agreement with the EU, as well as Moldova’s international commitments (water-related Sustainable Development Goals, and the “Water-to-all” commitment); 2) the financial sustainability of operators; and 3) the affordability of WSS services for end-users, especially low-income segments of the population.

  • 30-June-2017

    English

    OECD Territorial Reviews: Morelos, Mexico

    Morelos is one of the smallest states in Mexico, and close to Mexico City. It contains a number of economic and environmental assets in its territory, but has weak productivity levels. This review looks at how Morelos is seeking to boost its economy, particularly through inclusive growth policies such as enhancing human capital and promoting innovation. It also highlights areas of untapped potential for economic growth across rural areas and the tourism and environmental sectors, and offers suggestions for how Morelos could address governance challenges.

  • 20-June-2017

    English

    Green Growth Indicators 2017

    Policies that promote green growth need to be founded on a good understanding of the determinants of green growth and need to be supported with appropriate indicators to monitor progress. This book is an update of the 2014 edition. It presents a selection of updated and new indicators that illustrate the progress that OECD and G20 countries have made since the 1990s. The OECD Green Growth Strategy supports countries in fostering economic growth and development while ensuring that natural assets continue to provide the resources and environmental services on which our well-being relies.

  • 15-June-2017

    English

    Multi-dimensional Review of Kazakhstan - Volume 2. In-depth Analysis and Recommendations

    Kazakhstan has embarked upon an ambitious reform agenda to realise its aspiration of becoming one of the top 30 global economies by 2050. The country’s economy and society have undergone deep transformations since independence. To sustain economic progress, overcome recent difficulties, and drive improvements in well-being to realise its aspirations, Kazakhstan will need to address a number of challenges to ensure its economy becomes more productive and diverse, and is sufficiently flexible and resilient in the face of an ever-shifting external environment. This next stage of economic transformation will require continuing reforms. This report discusses policy actions to address four key obstacles to development in Kazakhstan, identified in Volume 1 of this review. It presents in-depth analysis and recommendations to improve the economy’s resilience through diversification, to mobilise financing for development, to transform the role of the state in the economy, including through privatisation, and to improve the effectiveness of environmental regulations.

  • 10-June-2017

    English

    Building Inclusive Labour Markets: Kazakhstan

    Kazakhstan has made major economic and social advances in the past decade and a half. Yet, Kazakhstan needs to sustain high growth rates in the future to converge towards the living standards of OECD countries. This report provides a review of the labour market and social policies that could help Kazakhstan in its dual objectives of building more inclusive labour markets, while maintaining a path of strong growth. It explores the role that institutions and policies play in helping vulnerable groups to access gainful and productive jobs, particularly focusing on three key groups: youth, older workers, and people with disabilities, and provides a comprehensive set of policies to increase the employment and employability of these groups. Evaluations and lessons from innovative experiences in OECD and other countries are used to formulate recommendations tailored to Kazakhstan.

  • 2-June-2017

    English

    Policy Coherence for Sustainable Development 2017 - Eradicating Poverty and Promoting Prosperity

    With the adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, all nations committed to a set of universal, integrated and transformational goals and targets, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Translating the new vision of the SDGs into action is a major challenge. This year, Ministers will gather at the High-Level Political Forum of the United Nations to take stock of progress, with a particular focus on eradicating poverty and enhancing prosperity in a changing world.

    Against this backdrop, Policy Coherence for Sustainable Development 2017 seeks to inform policy making by showing how a policy coherence lens can support implementation efforts, drawing on OECD evidence and analysis. It identifies challenges and good institutional practices for enhancing policy coherence in SDG implementation, drawing on the experience of the early implementers of the SDGs.

    The report introduces eight building blocks for policy coherence for sustainable development as well as a conceptual “coherence monitor” to track progress on policy coherence. It also includes nine voluntary national reviews which were presented at the 2016 High-Level Political Forum of the United Nations (Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Mexico, Norway, Korea, Switzerland and Turkey).

  • 1-June-2017

    English

    OECD Investment Policy Reviews: Kazakhstan 2017

    The Kazakh authorities have embarked upon an ambitious reform programme to improve the country’s framework for investment and strengthen the country as an attractive investment destination. This review, which was prepared in close cooperation with the Kazakh authorities in response to their 2012 request to adhere to the Declaration on International Investment and Multinational Enterprises (OECD Declaration), analyses the general investment framework as well as recent reform, and shows where further efforts are necessary. It assesses Kazakhstan’s ability to comply with the principles of openness, transparency and non-discrimination and its policy convergence with international responsible business conduct standards. Capitalising on the OECD’s multidisciplinary nature, this review also studies other areas such as the policy framework for the balancing of investor protection and the government's right to regulate, investment promotion and facilitation, SMEs policy, infrastructure development, trade policy and anti-corruption efforts. Since the first review ok Kazakhstan, in 2011, the authorities have made strides in opening the country to international investment and in improving the policy framework for investment. But additional efforts are required in some policy areas to strengthen Kazakhstan’s attractiveness for investors.

  • 31-May-2017

    English

    Engaging Employers in Apprenticeship Opportunities

    This joint OECD-ILO publication provides guidance on how the local and regional level can successfully boost employer engagement in apprenticeships and other types of work-based learning, drawing on case studies across nine countries. In many OECD countries, there has been increasing interest in apprenticeships as both a route into employment and a workforce up-skilling mechanism. The success of such approaches is contingent on having a high level of employer buy-in, notably in the design, development and delivery of such apprenticeship systems, to complement adaptive national framework policies at the local level.

  • 31-May-2017

    English

    OECD Territorial Reviews: Kazakhstan

    Kazakhstan has experienced a long period of high and sustained economic growth, largely driven by oil and gas exports. However, the drop in 2014 of the international price of oil highlighted the risks of dependence on natural resource activities. Kazakhstan must diversify its economic base to ensure that it can continue to “catch up” and move into higher value-added goods and services. This review looks at how a modern approach to regional development can help Kazakhstan, by mobilising the growth potential of different parts of the economy and territory, supporting economic diversification and reducing regional inequalities.

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