Publications


  • 14-November-2017

    English

    OECD Guidelines on Measuring the Quality of the Working Environment

    This publication presents an internationally agreed set of guidelines for producing more comparable statistics on the quality of the working environment, a concept that encompasses all the non-pecuniary aspects of one's job, and is one of the three dimensions of the OECD Job Quality framework. These Guidelines take stock of current data availability in this field, review the analytic and policy uses of these measures, proposes a conceptual framework based on 6 dimensions and 17 characteristics (ranging from physical risk factors and work intensity, through to task discretion, autonomy and opportunities for self-realisation), assesses the statistical quality of measures in this field, and provides guidance to data producers and users on methodological challenges in this field. These Guidelines also include a number of prototype surveys modules that national and international agencies could use in their surveys.

    These Guidelines have been produced as part of the OECD Better Life Initiative, a pioneering project launched in 2011 with the objective of measuring society's conditions across 11 dimensions of people's well-being. They follow on from similar measurement guidelines on subjective well-being, micro statistics on household wealth, integrated analysis of the distribution on household income, consumption and wealth, as well as trust.

  • 14-November-2017

    English

    OECD Guidelines on Measuring Trust

    Trust, both interpersonal trust, and trust in institutions, is a key ingredient of growth, societal well-being and governance. As a first step to improving existing measures of trust, the OECD Guidelines on Measuring Trust provide international recommendations on collecting, publishing, and analysing trust data to encourage their use by National Statistical Offices (NSOs). The Guidelines also outline why measures of trust are relevant for monitoring and policy making, and why NSOs have a critical role in enhancing the usefulness of existing trust measures. Besides looking at the statistical quality of trust measures, best approaches for measuring trust in a reliable and consistent way and guidance for reporting, interpretation and analysis are provided. A number of prototype survey modules that national and international agencies can use in their household surveys are included.

    These Guidelines have been produced as part of the OECD Better Life Initiative, a pioneering project launched in 2011, with the objective to measure society’s progress across eleven domains of well-being. They complement a series of similar measurement guidelines on subjective well-being, micro statistics on household wealth, integrated analysis of the distribution on household income, consumption and wealth, as well as the quality of the working environment.

  • 30-October-2017

    English

    Development Co-operation Report 2017 - Data for Development

    Ninety per cent of all the world’s data were generated in the last two years alone. “Big data” and the “Internet of things” are more than buzzwords: the data revolution is transforming the way economies and societies are functioning across the planet. This is an opportunity that should not to be missed: more and better data can help boost inclusive growth, fight inequalities and combat climate change. These data are also essential to measure and monitor progress against the Sustainable Development  Goals.
     
    The value of data in enabling development is uncontested. Yet, we still lack good quality data in most developing countries. Why are over half of deaths and one-third of births worldwide unaccounted for? Why is investment in statistical capacity - 0.25% of ODA - not a priority for most providers of development assistance?

    There is a need for stronger political leadership, greater investment and more collective action to bridge the data divide. This report makes a strong business case for strengthening national statistical systems. With the unfolding data revolution, developing countries and donors have a unique chance to act now to boost data production and use for the benefit of citizens. This volume sets out a number of priority steps and good practices that will help policy makers and providers of development assistance to make data work for development.

    The profiles of providers of development co-operation (Part II of this report) are already available. The full report will be released in October 2017.

  • 16-October-2017

    English

    OECD Integrity Review of Colombia - Investing in Integrity for Peace and Prosperity

    Integrity is crucial in order to ensure sustainable peace in Colombia. This report provides a focused analysis of Colombia’s integrity system, addressing existing gaps and elaborating policy recommendations on how to build a coherent public integrity system. The review pays special attention to improving co-ordination at the national level and with the regions, cultivating a culture of integrity in the public administration, and enabling effective accountability through internal control and risk management. It emphasises the priority of mainstreaming integrity policies in the processes and sectors related to the implementation of the Peace Agreement to prevent corruption and to contribute to the inclusive and sustainable development of the country.

  • 8-October-2017

    English

    Women's Economic Empowerment in Selected MENA Countries - The Impact of Legal Frameworks in Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia

    This report examines how current legal provisions in Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia are impacting women’s ability to fully participate in economic life, both as employees and entrepreneurs. It is based on a comparative analysis of the various rights set out in constitutions, personal status laws, labour laws, in addition to tax and business laws. The report recognises the considerable progress made – in particular in the aftermath of the 2011 uprisings – following the adoption of constitutional and institutional reforms to strengthen women’s status.

    Yet ensuring sufficient opportunities for women remains a challenge in the six countries. The report suggests that this may be due to different factors such as: the existence of certain laws that are gender discriminatory, contradictions between various legal frameworks, lack of enforcement mechanisms, and barriers for women in accessing justice.  Through targeted policies, countries can tackle these challenges, and help unleash women’s potential to boost growth, competitiveness and inclusive social development.

  • 30-September-2017

    English

    Illicit Financial Flows - Illicit Trade and Development Challenges in West Africa

    This report shows how criminal economies and illicit financial flows through and within West Africa affect people’s lives. It goes beyond the traditional analysis of illicit financial flows, which focuses on the value of monetary flows. The report exposes the ways in which criminal and illicit activities and resulting illicit financial flows damage governance, the economy, development and security. It presents case studies based on concrete examples from West Africa of human trafficking, drug smuggling, counterfeit goods, gold mining and terrorism financing. It identifies networks and drivers – in the region or elsewhere – that allow these criminal economies to thrive, by feeding and facilitating these activities and the circulation of illicitly-obtained revenue. It also examines the impacts on local communities, such as changes in wealth distribution, power dynamics and the degree to which illicit money undermines social organisation.

    This book proposes a policy framework for both source and destination countries of illicit flows that looks beyond the concerns of developed countries to enhance development prospects at the local level and respond to the needs of the most vulnerable stakeholders. Combating criminal economies and preventing illicit financial flows will require sustained partnerships between producing and consuming countries. West Africa cannot be expected to address these challenges alone.

  • 30-September-2017

    English

    Production Transformation Policy Reviews - Actions to Succeed in a Changing World

    As countries are increasingly concerned with the future of globalisation and industry and their role in global production networks, defining and implementing policies for economic transformation that deliver on the competitive, social, and environmental goals has become paramount. The complex and fast-changing global economic landscape calls for a better understanding of the ongoing technological and industrial re-organisation, to enable policy makers to better plan and act for the present and the future. The Production Transformation Policy Reviews (PTPRs) are the policy tool for assessment and guidance on strategies for economic transformation. Developed within the framework of the OECD Initiative for Policy Dialogue on Global Value Chains, Production Transformation and Development, the PTPRs provide a guiding framework to inform policy choices on competitiveness.

    This document clarifies the rationale for the PTPRs as a policy assessment and guidance tool, presents the conceptual framework, clarifies the value proposition, and provides information about the review process.

  • 29-September-2017

    English

    Improving Domestic Financial Support Mechanisms in Moldova's Water and Sanitation Sector

    The water supply and sanitation (WSS) sector in Moldova is not financially sustainable: tariffs do not typically cover operational costs and capital investments are heavily funded by external development partners. This report analyses several options for streamlining and strengthening domestic financial support mechanisms (DFSMs) in terms of both supply and demand, discusses different scenarios and recommends a number of actions to ensure effective DFSM implementation, notably: 1) sufficient investment for the implementation of targets and obligations set in the national strategies, the Association Agreement with the EU, as well as Moldova’s international commitments (water-related Sustainable Development Goals, and the “Water-to-all” commitment); 2) the financial sustainability of operators; and 3) the affordability of WSS services for end-users, especially low-income segments of the population.

  • 22-September-2017

    English

  • 20-September-2017

    English

    Trade Facilitation and the Global Economy

    In a globalised world, where goods cross borders many times as intermediate and as final products, trade facilitation is essential to lowering overall trade costs and increasing economic welfare, in particular for developing and emerging economies. Facilitation efforts undertaken by various countries around the world also show that the benefits of such measures clearly compensate the costs and challenges posed by their implementation.
     

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